Almost every country in the world has the soil, water, and climate resources to grow enough food so that all their people can eat a healthy diet. Why then are more people than ever starving and malnourished throughout the world? As many people in the Mad River Valley will learn during the this years' Eat Local Challenge, global food production and gargantuan scale monoculture farming makes us more and more dependent on people we don't know and will never meet to feed us.

Fred Magdoff
Fred Magdoff

While food globalization may mean strawberries in January for middle class Americans, it has a much graver impact on people in the US and throughout the world who go hungry everyday. As multinational agricultural corporations penetrate third world countries, subsistence farmers are being forced off of the land and have to move to cities where jobs are scarce and without access to land to grow their own food, farmers are at the mercy of the world food system. As more cropland is used for biofuels and to support livestock to satisfy the increasing demand for meat among the middle class in Latin America and Asia, prices for corn have gone up by 70 percent in the past two years and rice prices doubled in 2007.

The global food crisis is an issue that Fred Magdoff, Professor Emeritus of Plant and Soil Science at the University of Vermont has studied and written about for many years. On September 18 the Green Mountain Global Forum is partnering with the Mad River Valley Localvore Project to bring Professor Magdoff to the Bundy Center for the Arts to provide an introduction to the global food crisis. Magdoff will discuss the compounding factors that are leading to greater starvation and malnutrition than the world has ever seen and he will also present potential solutions to both the acute and underlying food security crises.

Venue: Bundy Center for the Arts, Waitsfield, 7pm start.